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Power and Energy Measurement: Worldwide Market Forecasts - First Edition  
 
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Date Published : Friday 10th of February 2012
Number of Pages : 71
 

Summary

Advanced power and energy measurement is already providing opportunities for certain functions in certain power supplies in certain applications. This report highlights where these functions, power supplies and applications converge, and when they are likely to offer the greatest commercial prospects. Topics include:

Background and Demand Characteristics
Utility Demand Response
Other Demand Characteristics
Market Drivers
Worldwide Power & Energy Measurement Forecasts
Application Forecasts
Wattage Forecasts
Power Supply Forecasts
Selected Company Profiles

Appendix A: Energy Management Systems: Conference Reports

Appendix B: Terms and Acronyms

Table of Contents

Introduction
Background and Demand Characteristics
Utility Demand Response
Other Demand Characteristics
Zero Net Energy (ZNE)
Standards and Regulations
Digital Power Management and Accuracy Requirements
Market Drivers
Power Factor Correction (PFC)
Worldwide Power & Energy Measurement Forecasts
Application Forecasts
Distributed Power Systems
Metering
Home Automation
Industrial Automation
Building Automation
Wattage Forecasts
Power Supply Forecasts
Selected Company Profiles
    Allegro Microsystems
    Analog Devices
    C&D Technologies
    Cirrus Logic
    Fairchild Semiconductor
    Maxim Integrated Products
    Microchip Technology Inc
    Pulse Electronics
    ROAL Electronics
    STMicroelectronics
    Texas Instruments
Appendix A: Energy Management Systems: Conference Reports
Appendix B: Terms and Acronyms

List of Exhibits

Tables
Table 1 – Worldwide Power & Energy Measurement Market, by Application (millions of units)
Table 2 – Worldwide Power & Energy Measurement Market, by Application (excluding Metering) (millions of units)
Table 3 – Worldwide Power & Energy Measurement Market, Distributed Power Systems (millions of units)
Table 4 – Worldwide Power & Energy Measurement Market, Metering (millions of units)
Table 5 – Worldwide Power & Energy Measurement Market, Home Automation (millions of units)
Table 6 – Worldwide Power & Energy Measurement Market, Industrial Automation (millions of units)
Table 7 – Worldwide Power & Energy Measurement Market, Building Automation (millions of units)
Table 8 – Worldwide Power & Energy Measurement Market, All Applications Excluding Metering, by Wattage (millions of units)
Table 9 – Worldwide Power & Energy Measurement Market, by Power Supply (excluding Metering) (millions of units)

Figures
Figure 1 – ADP1048 Advanced Input Power Monitoring Function, Block Diagram
Figure 2 – Pulse Electronics Rogowski Coil
Figure 3 – Worldwide Power & Energy Measurement Market, by Application (millions of units)
Figure 4 – Worldwide Power & Energy Measurement Market, by Application (excluding Metering) (millions of units)
Figure 5 – Worldwide Power & Energy Measurement Market, by Application (market share)
Figure 6 – Worldwide Power & Energy Measurement Market, by Application (excluding Metering) (market share)
Figure 7 – Where to Measure Power in the Data Center
Figure 8 – Cabinet Power Distribution Unit
Figure 9 – Worldwide Power & Energy Measurement Market, Distributed Power Systems (millions of units)
Figure 10 – Worldwide Power & Energy Measurement Market, Server by Power Supply (millions of units)
Figure 11 – Worldwide Power & Energy Measurement Market, Storage by Power Supply (millions of units)
Figure 12 – Worldwide Power & Energy Measurement Market, Network Equipment by Power Supply (millions of units)
Figure 13 – Worldwide Power & Energy Measurement Market, Telecom by Power Supply (millions of units)
Figure 14 – Electricity Meter Block Diagram
Figure 15 – Worldwide Power & Energy Measurement Market, Metering (millions of units)
Figure 16 – Monster Power Gateway and Power Center
Figure 17 – LG Electronics “Smart” Appliances
Figure 18 – Worldwide Power & Energy Measurement Market, Home Automation (millions of units)
Figure 19 – Premium/Servo Industrial Drive Example
Figure 20 – Worldwide Power & Energy Measurement Market, Industrial Automation (millions of units)
Figure 21 – Site Controls Energy Management Platform
Figure 22 – Worldwide Power & Energy Measurement Market, Building Automation (millions of units)
Figure 23 – Worldwide Power & Energy Measurement Market, All Applications (excluding Metering), by Wattage (millions of units)
Figure 24 – Worldwide Power & Energy Measurement Market, All Applications (excluding Metering), by Wattage (market share)
Figure 25 – Worldwide Power & Energy Measurement Market, by Power Supply (excluding Metering) (millions of units)
Figure 26 – Worldwide Power & Energy Measurement Market, by Power Supply (excluding Metering) (market share)

Executive Summary

Measuring real-time energy consumption, and adjusting power delivery at critical loads (as opposed to simple “on-off” functions), are becoming increasingly important in today’s commercial, residential and industrial environments. The ability to “fine-tune” energy usage requires sophisticated power monitoring and measurement techniques.

Driven by such diverse trends as Zero Net Energy and data center infrastructure management, this type of “advanced” power measurement has value in Distributed Power Systems, Metering, Home Automation, Industrial Automation, and Building Automation. The market for Power & Energy Measurement in these applications is projected to grow from 25.3 million units in 2012 to 108.4 million units in 2017, a compound annual growth rate (CAGR) of 33.8%.

Each application has very specific dynamics, however, and is expected to grow at varying rates. Applications need different levels of advanced power measurement, for instance. In other cases, a single application will provide several opportunities. “Smart” meters, for instance, will provide board-level power opportunities, with a subset of that market – “demand response” meters – leading to specific power supply opportunities.

Darnell has identified four markets that will benefit from advanced power and energy measurement functions: Embedded AC-DC Power Supplies, Power Distribution Units; Motor Drives; and Telecom Rectifiers. Embedded AC-DC power supplies are a strong unit market with healthy sales between 2012 and 2017. But all of these products have been targeted by companies making ICs for advanced power measurement functions; and they are all likely to be good markets, both in terms of market share and growth rates. Other power supplies, such as photovoltaic inverters and uninterruptible power supplies, are not forecast, but their role in this market is put in perspective.

“Zero net energy” is one of the drivers that could lead to an increased need for accurate power and energy measurement. Renewable energy micro-grids with decentralized management and control offer increasing degrees of grid reliability, stability, and resiliency in the face of power outages. In this situation, the role of the utility may expand over time to include both power management and power generation (exporting and importing power). Such power generation and management includes PV rooftops systems, PV/zero-energy homes and vehicle systems, and other distributed energy resource systems. Linking PV systems at the community level can offer some of the economies of scale of utility-scale PV applications. Many of these PV applications are already cost-effective for certain markets, and they are likely to expand over the next few years. PV inverters, although not included in this forecast, represent a potential, longer-term market.

At the front end, digital controllers are being designed with an integrated power factor correction (PFC) function to provide more accurate input power metering. These new PFC controller designs, along with new current sensing ICs, could be used in ac-dc power supplies at the front end to “intelligently solve increasingly complex power management challenges” in future smart grid applications. PFC is a function that could be integrated into power measurement products at the higher wattage levels where it has been regulated and is required. PFC is not a requirement for power measurement, however, so not all products with PFC are candidates for such measurement.

At a broad level, so-called “energy management systems” are being implemented in a variety of facilities, but not all of these systems are “critical” or complex enough to require dynamic power measurement and control. Economic factors will drive the “first wave” of implementations that can benefit from these functions. Data centers, industrial facilities, commercial buildings, telecom sites, and utility demand response are some of the applications where such power monitoring and measurement are both needed and cost-effective. This report does not focus on power and energy management functions on the utility side; it only addresses functions and equipment on the customer premises side, including commercial buildings, industrial facilities and residences.

Demand response is expected to be the underlying driver for utilities’ use of energy management and related power measurement systems. This includes smart meters, primarily. Although a single device, its measurement use is spread over a number of applications that are frequently seen as separate markets, including smart appliances, home automation, photovoltaics, and electric vehicle charging. Concurrently, utilities are implementing energy management systems that can monitor, measure and control multiple devices in a variety of settings. Since precise energy usage and measurement is the goal, leading to rate reporting and adjustments, accurate data transmission is critical.

Such demand characteristics are opening up a new market that Darnell calls “demand response” meters. This development is so new that companies are just beginning to consider it – making it a good “leading-edge” opportunity.

Obstacles exist, however. Very few residences and other buildings currently make use of “smart devices” because standards for communications and capabilities are still being worked out. A major issue is the low percentage of utilities with time-of-use (TOU) rates, which are considered necessary for smart appliance adoption and use. Several utilities are not planning to offer TOU rates for the general public until the end of the forecast period, so smart appliances are expected to be a longer-term trend..

Digital power management is part of almost all energy management solutions, since “intelligent” data communication is an essential feature of these systems. Accuracy of data acquisition and power measurement is challenging from a number of perspectives, and its importance (and how precise it needs to be) determines, in part, the market penetration rates used to derive a forecast. For instance, a data center may only need to be “accurate enough” but still cost-effective: going above 3% accuracy may involve a significant cost-adder. Utilities will need more accuracy, on the other hand.

Wattages will be a defining factor in the power measurement systems market, as well, with the higher wattages expected to have the higher sales. In certain applications, PFC is a function that could be integrated into power measurement products at these wattage levels where it is required, for example.

Due to their more complex architectures with multiple loads, Distributed Power Systems are already a major market for general “energy management.” These are less price-sensitive markets, and they require the more sophisticated measurement and control offered by such systems. Servers, for example, need accurate ac- and dc-power measurement, active calibration of dc current measurements, sufficient VRM slew rates to support advanced processor power management, and power system communication to ensure that the entire system stays operational when redundancy is lost during “oversubscription” events. The efficiency improvements that come from power measuring and real-time optimization can off-set the extra cost.

Government regulations and trends such as zero net energy will drive the need for even more energy efficiency and precise power measurement. PFC is already regulated at certain wattage levels, and the Smart Grid is slowly getting standardized worldwide.

Smart metering has dramatically increased the need for products that offer precise measurements in multi-phase metering, while simplifying designs and reducing costs. And Energy Star has established energy efficiency guidelines for servers, which will have an impact on data centers.

Although still emerging, advanced power and energy measurement is already providing opportunities for certain functions in certain power supplies in certain applications. This report highlights where these functions, power supplies and applications converge, and when they are likely to offer the greatest commercial prospects.

Countries Covered

Worldwide

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This product was added to our catalog on Friday 10 February, 2012.

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